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Friday, October 14th, 2011 | Author:

DON’T FORGET  

 – 10 days left to vote for the WWA

on the natwest community awards scheme……

http://communityforce.natwest.com/project/1865

 

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011 | Author:

Monday morning: new family makes the overland trip to see the willow sculpture

Sunday, May 08th, 2011 | Author:

..."When no other colour can be seen but green, mile after mile of green... " Richard Church (1893-1972) - The Inheritors (1957).

Monday, December 20th, 2010 | Author:

Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year from the Watercress Wildlife Association ………..

and could this be evidence of someone who should have used the main gate ……?

Stick to dry land in the future, even if it is covered with snow !

Saturday, November 06th, 2010 | Author:
Saturday 6th November.
 

The usual peace and tranquillity broken by the frenzied squawk of a small group of parakeet!
Eventually seen off by equally vociferous magpie
Sunday, August 29th, 2010 | Author:

The swans are back, chasing away allcomers. Even the heron….
.

and the WWA are crowned Water Vole Champions by the Herts and Middx Wildlife Trust……

but just where are they? Answers on a postcard please.

 

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Friday, July 30th, 2010 | Author:

Occasionally you see something that delights the ole spirit. In the last week, I saw 2. The first occasion was at midday during the week when I spotted a muntjac (my first) near the heap for grassnakes. Funny dog, I thought and the way it moved its tail was most odd. I know other members have seen one or even 2 before but they had always escaped me. I was amazed it had ventured so far into the reserve and think it’s not only foxes which are becoming less fearful. My second impressive sight was a few days later,when I was doing my regular butterfly monitoring. I came across at least 10 gatekeepers, flying in a group but as you can see from the photo doing their own thing. (It was impossible to get all 10 in a photo as I had to get quite closeup for them to be visible.) It was also pretty impossible to count them, as you can probably imagine – worse than counting sheep! That day I also spotted the first water lily I’ve seen on the little pond and saw a little frog and heard another croaking away happily. The photo below was the best I could do without falling in ……

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Thursday, June 24th, 2010 | Author:

25.06.2010

while attempting to photograph these little creatures,
I became a little sidetracked by the banded demoiselles.

When perched on a leaf they obviously present a pretty picture.
In flight their wings seemed to act like helicopter rotors.

That was it, I had to capture one in flight.

here’s one at rest

in flight, look at the helicopter wings!

here, we have a female banded demoiselle.

another variation, here I think we have a ruddy darter.
My trusty nature book leads me to this identification -see bottom of posting.

this is a mystery bug, anyone got any ideas?
There are so many minute creatures whizzing about and they all seen to be tiny,
fast and hard to capture, with a camera, a net may be more successful.

here’s another, sitting on a lily pad -not found it in my book, yet.

my trusty book by the way: the Collins Complete British Wildlife by Paul Sterry.
It’s really useful as identifying photographs convey exactly what one sees in the field.
I found one cheap in a garden centre last year. Have a look for it.

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Sunday, June 20th, 2010 | Author:




The butterfly beds are beginning to look good but where are the butterflies?
This summer I’ve seen orange tipped, small white, comma, peacock, speckled wood and common blue – but only a few each time I visit the site and none today

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Thursday, June 17th, 2010 | Author:


The male Banded demoiselle is very striking and familiar, with its electric blue body and dark patches on each wing that catch the eye as it flutters. The female is probably less well known. Here’s one demonstrating the full emerald green bodywork and wings. There were loads of males and females as well as other species fluttering around the site in the sun today, particularly by the low bridge by the spit.


I didn’t get such a good photo of the male, but I include it for completeness. I suppose it’s kind of arty!